Science Proves Lucid Dreaming Increases Self Awareness

Avatar Michelle Estevez | September 4, 2018

 

Although people have been lucid dreaming for thousands of years, scientists are continuing to study its effects on the human brain. Among the many benefits, increased self-awareness appears to be a common link amongst lucid dreamers. By improving certain parts of our brain, we can extend to other areas of the mind.

Founding Fathers Prove Lucid Dreaming:

Keith Hearne was the first scientist to prove his participant was in a lucid dream. He used a polysomnography and had his participant perform planned eye movements once he became lucid. If you’re interested, you can even find Hearnes original study on display at The Science Museum in London. This same study was approached in a similar fashion by researcher, Stephen Laberge. He also founded the Lucidity Institute which not only encourages research in the field of lucid dreaming but also provides courses on how to become lucid.

Some claim Laberge copied Hearne, but regardless, Hearne and Laberge set the framework for others to study lucid dreams.  study and now scientists worldwide are researching the benefits of lucid dreaming to this day.

The Role Lucid Dreams Play With Metacognitive Mechanisms:

A different part of our brain, the anterior prefrontal cortex,  is being put to work when we lucid dream. This area plays a large role in self-reflection. It makes sense. If we are aware that we are dreaming, aren’t we reflecting on ourselves at every move in that dream? After all, the entire dreamscape is a construct of our own mind. What we see is a projection of what we believe. The more we lucid dream, the more we activate this part of the brain and self-reflect. Eventually, all of this self-reflection leads to an increase in self-awareness.

Current Research Finds Link Between Lucid Dreams & Self Awareness:

As research continues, scientists theorize lucid dreaming increases self-awareness by studying brain images. By comparing these images of those who lucid dream to those who don’t, neuroscientists are only beginning to scratch the surface behind the benefits of lucid dreaming. Perhaps this might even be a tool in advancing our human evolution.