IceWind Merges Ancient Principles with Modern Twist for Affordable Eco-Design

Avatar Flux Air Team | September 2, 2020

IceWind Merges Ancient Principles with Modern Twist for Affordable Eco-Design

IceWind


“People, when they look at it they don’t realize what it is. They just think it is a sculpture or something. They’re not thinking about this as an ugly energy production device,” Sæþór Ásgeirsson admits, IceWind Founder and CEO.

Typical wind harnessing devices are designed for larger spaces and often take up a lot of room. However, IceWind’s eco-friendly approach provides an artistic design that can be applied just anywhere. 

IceWind is an Icelandic-based renewable energy company that plans to expand worldwide. On July 30, 2020, Icewind made their debut in the United States with select sustainable energy models to embrace off-grid living. 

Built by hand, these devices are aesthetically pleasing and possess an otherworldly and robotic strength. To say great things come in small packages is just the tip of the metaphoric iceberg. 

Each device is made with care and attention to provide optimal results in any climate. While their prices are made for the everyday consumer, their strength against inclement weather is immeasurable.

Ancient Principles Merge with A Modern Design

Applying old technology that dates as far back to the Persian empire, the IceWind approach merges ancient wisdom with a modern twist.

“We have taken this base design and kind of brought it to the modern age with modern materials carbon fire or stainless steel. We have made it really strong. We have engineered and cut the plates so the turbine never goes on over spin and we just did the system really simple and therefore we can keep the price down,” describes Sæþór Ásgeirsson, Iceland’s founder and CEO.

Their thought in design makes it possible to keep prices affordable, but also ensure protection against wind damage. For example, conventional windmills can often catch on fire when wind speeds are too high. In the Icelandic weather, this gives traditional windmills an average lifespan of just three years. 

On the other hand, IceWind’s consumer model, Freya, is said to last up to 25 to 30 years generating power with just 7.8 mph wind speeds.

IceWind Freya Model: Made for Everyday Use

With a promising lifespan, the Freya model promises to cut down the usage and costs of conventional power sources. While one turbine won’t replace all utilities, adding two to three of these well-designed machines can power most residential homes. It is an exceptional solution for those who wish to live a more affordable and eco-friendly lifestyle. 

Freya Characteristics:

  • Innovative blade design – Features two sets of blades (one inner and one outer), providing low start-up speeds, lift for greater power output, and self-speed regulation
  • Longevity – Engineered to last and generate consistent power for over 25 years, with negligible operation and maintenance cost alongside de-icing and hydrophobic coatings
  • Power in any condition – Begins rotating and generating power at only 4.5 miles per hour wind speeds, and can continue spinning and generating power up to hurricane wind conditions (140+ mile per hour speeds)
  • Sustainability – Manufactured through sustainable methods and serves to reduce carbon emissions and reduce overreliance on fossil fuels
  • Aesthetic – Built to pair the realms of artistic design and engineering beautifully

IceWind Njord Model: Made for Commercial Use

Made for powering larger structures like telecommunication buildings and outdoor advertising, the Njord model is set to be available in 2021. Similar to the Freya, this commercial model reduces costs and leaves no carbon footprint.

Njord Specs:

  • Rugged – Bolted alongside a telecom tower to being installed atop a remote station, the Njord can be applied anywhere
  • Longevity – Engineered to last and generate consistent power for over 25 years, with negligible operation and maintenance cost alongside de-icing and hydrophobic coatings
  • Power in any condition – Begins rotating and generating power at only 4.5 miles per hour wind speeds, and can continue spinning and generating power up to hurricane wind conditions (140+ mile per hour speeds)
  • Adaptability – The Njord can survive and generate energy in locations where conventional power methods such as diesel generators cannot be implemented


To learn more about IceWind’s mission and turbines explore their website.


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